22 of 108 DEEPYOGA.CA • DR. PANKAJ SETH, ND
The later Buddhist change of attitude toward the final goal is paralleled exactly by the contemporary Hindu development. As we have seen, in Hinayana usage the term bodhisattva denoted a great being on the point of becoming a Buddha and so passing from time to nirvana, an archetype of the Buddhist lay-initiate escaping from the world, whereas in the Mahayana the concept was translated into a time-reaffirming symbol of universal saviorship. Through renouncing Buddhahood the Bodhisattva made it clear that the task of Moksha, "release, liberation, redemption from the vicissitudes of time," was not the highest good; in fact, that moksha is finally meaningless, samsara and nirvana being of the nature of sunyata, "emptiness, the void." In the same spirit the Hindu Tantric initiate exclaims: "Who seeks nirvana?" "What is gained by moksha?" "Water mingles with water."
                                                                    Philosophies of India • Heinrich Zimmer; Princeton Bollingen Series XXVI, 1951